URBAN ECOLOGY

A place dedicated to city design, urban design, architecture and sustainability as well as promoting Local culture within Edmonton, Alberta.

Evolution of the Bicycle

by Visual Artwork

Intro to Aquaponics: Raise your own fish and food year round!

Ever wanted to learn about Aquaponics?  Aquaponics is a food producing system that produces organic edible fish and vegetables in a closed-loop sustainable manner.  It uses 90% less water than traditional agriculture and produces much higher yields.  It works great in Alberta, as it allows us to grow healthy, sustainably produced veggies right in the comfort of our own homes.  This course will cover everything you need to know to start your own aquaponics system!   Some of the topics that will be covered include: What is Aquaponics and why is it so cool? Basics of an Aquaponic System System Design Let’s Get Growing- Choosing your plants Something Fishy- Everything you need to know to obtain and raise happy fish Starting and Maintaining your System All course participants will also receive a copy of Aquaponic Gardening by Sylvia Berstein and a discounted rate on future courses.   Scott Weir is an urban farmer and Aquaponics researcher.  His interest in Aquaponics has been fueled through the studying of systems in places such as California and New Orleans and through the hands-on instruction he has received from some of the world’s leading experts. He is often asked to speak at events and to various groups ranging from student and community groups to elected officials.  He has been recognized for his work with compact, indoor Aquaponic systems and in other areas of sustainability such as organization wide composting, hydroponics and Small Plot Intensive Farming.  For more on Scott and Aquaponics see the click here.

growcalgary

On a 9-acre parcel of land just west of Canada Olympic Park, a group of dedicated volunteers turned the soil and harvested the first crop on Canada’s largest urban agricultural farm. Our goal is to grow fresh produce for the Calgary Interfaith Food Bank to ensure all Calgarians have access to healthy, local food. Thanks to the generous spirit of our community we’ve reached our first milestone, but there’s still more to grow.

U of A students hope to ditch Coca-Cola contract

Brower Youth Awards for Environmental Leadership

What: Earth Island Institute established The Brower Youth Award for Environmental Leadership in 2000 to honor renowned environmental advocate David Brower. The Brower Youth Awards are housed in the New Leaders Initiative program at Earth Island Institute and we are thrilled to call forth a new generation of leaders for our 15th Annual Brower Youth Awards.

David Brower was quoted as saying, “I love to see what young people can do, before someone old tells them it’s impossible.” It is with this spirit that we recognize the outstanding leadership efforts of young people who are working for the protection of our shared planet. We elevate the accomplishments of these new leaders and invest in their continued success by providing ongoing access to resources, mentors, and opportunities to develop leadership skills.

Who: Young environmental change leaders ages 13 to 22 (as of July 1, 2014) living in North America (including Mexico, Canada, some Caribbean Islands) and US “Territories.”

When: Completed applications must be submitted online by May 12, 2014 9:00 p.m. Pacific time.

The Award

Each of the six recipients of the Brower Youth Awards will receive a $3,000 cash prize, a professionally produced short film about their work, and flight and lodging accommodations for a week long trip to the San Francisco Bay Area.

During their stay in California, the recipients will participate in a camping trip, leadership activities, speaking and media engagements, and trainings and environmental conferences giving them a chance to meet with mentors and peers. The week of activities culminates in the awards ceremony in front of more than 900 guests at the Nourse Theatre in San Francisco on October 21, 2014.

urbangeographies:

In the San Francisco Chronicle, Carl Nolte recently wrote: "You could argue that parklets are this San Francisco generation’s greatest invention. They are usually near some neighborhood coffee or lunch place and are open to anyone - a man feeding bits of his sandwich to his dog, a mother with a tiny kid in a stroller, older kids with their thumbs flying, texting away, old men soaking up the sun.”
Parklets are mini-parks created over parking spaces with a platform raised to sidewalk level, including seating and often plants and bike parking. San Francisco and other cities beginning to embrace the idea can install parklets on commercial streets built without such public space, allowing people a good place to sit, relax, and socialize while running errands. Nolte visited a parklet in the Mission District at 29th and Tiffany Ave:
"Everything is within a block or two: a big supermarket, a hardware emporium, half a dozen restaurants, a branch post office, a UPS store, four or five bars, a marijuana dispensary, an osteopath’s office, a bike repair place, and the Cafe Seventy8, where serious-looking people sit with laptops working on the Great American Novel or the Great American Spreadsheet."

urbangeographies:

In the San Francisco Chronicle, Carl Nolte recently wrote: "You could argue that parklets are this San Francisco generation’s greatest invention. They are usually near some neighborhood coffee or lunch place and are open to anyone - a man feeding bits of his sandwich to his dog, a mother with a tiny kid in a stroller, older kids with their thumbs flying, texting away, old men soaking up the sun.”

Parklets are mini-parks created over parking spaces with a platform raised to sidewalk level, including seating and often plants and bike parking. San Francisco and other cities beginning to embrace the idea can install parklets on commercial streets built without such public space, allowing people a good place to sit, relax, and socialize while running errands. Nolte visited a parklet in the Mission District at 29th and Tiffany Ave:

"Everything is within a block or two: a big supermarket, a hardware emporium, half a dozen restaurants, a branch post office, a UPS store, four or five bars, a marijuana dispensary, an osteopath’s office, a bike repair place, and the Cafe Seventy8, where serious-looking people sit with laptops working on the Great American Novel or the Great American Spreadsheet."

(via onurbanid)